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November 17th 2017
02:51:38 AM
Your Name  

Jackie Lewis

Your Location  

London

Years of Shorthand  

36

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

Pitman 2000 and New Era

Your Comments  

Can you advise why the word Righteous is written with an upward R and Tee when the pronunciation would indicate that it should be upward R and Chay?

(=I assume that the outline reflected the correct careful pronunciation in Pitman’s time, with the Ch version regarded as sloppy or clipped, like we do nowadays when some people use Ch in “Tuesday” or “tutor” or the J sound in “due” or “duty”. There may be people nowadays who would insist it is “-tyuss” and not Ch. As I have found when investigating words, there is (most annoyingly) no such thing as “the pronunciation”, it all varies with different persons, areas, ages, social situation, context and speed of speaking.

This form does have the advantage of retaining the primitive form for “right” thus keeping all derivatives similar. In the Introduction in the big red dictionary, it talks about “Derivatives anticipated” which means that when decisions were being made as to the official outline for a word, all the derivatives were considered together, so that, as far as possible and convenient, the outline could be modified easily and clearly for them, so as to avoid awkward outlines or ones too different from each other. The result is that they are easier to recall and read back. In the beginning days, learners were told to “choose the best outline” but as the system progressed, it became necessary to decide on the “best outlines” both in publications and in the dictionaries that soon followed, and so they became fixed.

Having said that, anyone is free of course to write any outline any way they choose, as long as they can read back, although I would assume for an exam or a teacher’s exam one would have to adhere to the official outlines for the system that one is claiming to be able to write. BP)

   
October 31st 2017
02:35:23 PM
Your Name  

Harikiran

Your Location  

India

Years of Shorthand  

1 year

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

N.Era

Your Comments  

This is a god send for people like me who are still learning Pitman Shorthand.

My first salute to Sir Pitman for inventing it and second to you for helping us to learn it easily.

Referring to Shorthand dictionary for each word was becoming tedious and this blog has really helped me master the skills faster.

Please continue the blog as you are doing a great job. May God Almighty give you health and strength to continue this great job!

Thanks a lot once again!

(=Thank you for your kind comments. This is exactly the purpose of the site, as fast writing needs familiarity with a large vocabulary of correct outlines, rather than an accumulation of so-called \"shortcuts\". Best wishes with your studies. BP)

   
October 28th 2017
11:38:53 AM
Your Name  

Susan McCann

Your Location  

Southampton, England

Years of Shorthand  

Fifty Nine, almost to the day

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era

Your Comments  

Thank you so much for your blog. I had dismissed my achievement in the world of shorthand, dictation so that this morning when my son aged 46 stated \'you can write shorthand\' it awakened a skill. I will rediscover it again thanks to your commitment. Kind regards, Susan McCann

(=It never disappears, it doesn\'t take much to bring it all back. BP)

   
October 19th 2017
10:38:28 AM
Your Name  

Mark

Your Location  

New Jersey, USA

Years of Shorthand  

Can't say zero anymore

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

N.Era

Your Comments  

Beryl, do you have any tips or advice when writing N. Era on unlined paper?

=
(1) Insert one or more vowel signs to distinguish otherwise identical outlines. This is the quickest way. Inserting the first vowel will replace the necessity to write in position, but some need more than that (e.g. amazing, amusing).

(2) Put a short dotted line to show where the notepad line would have been, underneath or to the right hand side of the outline. This is the normal method to “correct” an outline written in the wrong or unclear position (3 dots or dashes are sufficient). It would only be necessary for first or third position outlines, as second position can be assumed as the default. This is the only way if the outline cannot be vocalised e.g. short forms and contractions. I don’t recommend adding any vowels to short forms or contractions, as that makes it look like a regular outline, thus reintroducing ambiguity.

(3) It might be helpful to write each line of shorthand further apart, so that the writing is not cramped and so positions remain clearer.

   
October 17th 2017
03:18:03 PM
Your Name  

Sylvia Kent

Your Location  

Essex

Years of Shorthand  

1954-current

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era

Your Comments  

Wonderful website, Beryl. As a freelance writer of many years, I\'ve always kept up my interest in shorthand (working in business and Parliament for decades). It is second nature now and very useful in meetings and writerly gatherings!

   
August 27th 2017
11:23:21 AM
Your Name  

David T

Your Location  

Sydney

Years of Shorthand  

30

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

N.Era

Your Comments  

I first learned shorthand from a friend (now passed away). She wrote her shopping list in these \"odd looking squiggles\". I asked her what it was. Long story short, she started to teach me and, at that time 1981, she was still teaching secretarial studies for TAFENSW. I still use it occasionally, especially for computer passwords, which I keep in a small notebook on my desk. I was amongst the last category of \'stenographer\' employed by the NSW government in 1987.

I own a copy of the new testament and Alice in Wonderland, the former I never read. Also many text books, including a fully defined Pitman Dictionary.

Nice to find this

(=Glad you enjoy the site. Can I just mention that it is very easy for anyone finding \"squiggles\" to post them online for a translation, so an additional layer of obfuscation of the passwords, or distortion of the outlines, might be helpful, if your notebook is accessible to others. Hence I have put your initial instead of surname! I have the New Testament in Phonography, 1886, which is probably the same as yours, harder going when it is not New Era. BP)

   
August 24th 2017
08:08:56 AM
Your Name  

Fay

Your Location  

New Zealand

Years of Shorthand  

60 years

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era

Your Comments  

So lovely to find this blog. I passed Reporters Exam 180 wpm when I was 18. Still use shorthand all the time (now 76) and taught at nightschool for several years. When asked granddaughter if she wanted me to teach her she \"rolled her eyes\". Oh dear!!! Examiner for Reporters Exam was a Hansard reporter from NZ Parliament. NZ Herald had an article in the newspaper \"Five Fast Girls\" when five of us passed our Reporters Exam. History now!

   
August 13th 2017
06:05:34 PM
Your Name  

Tricia Thompson-Browne

Your Location  

Bermuda

Years of Shorthand  

52

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era & Pit 2K

Your Comments  

How marvellous. I always kept my old New Era Teach Yourself Shorthand book (which is how I learned) and then one day in a thrift shop found the 2k version and have been looking through it for a month or so and saddened to see what was left out.

So . . . glad to have found this website and lovely shorthand stories - all of which I can read, more or less 100% !! What fun.

Thanks for your efforts.

(=P2K wasn\'t meant to replace New Era, but in the end both were overtaken by computers, emails etc. I think there is still a place for shorthand in note taking, minutes and reporting, and of course I am happy to provide practice reading material for new and old users alike, fun for me too. BP)

   
August 9th 2017
04:57:41 PM
Your Name  

Anne

Your Location  

Ireland

Years of Shorthand  

50

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era

Your Comments  

Just discovered your website. I learned shorthand at the age of 14 at Grammar School and loved it from day one. I haven\'t used it much since retirement 10 years ago, but now I have found your website, I will be visiting regularly to keep up the skill. Many thanks for your efforts.

   
June 27th 2017
06:45:52 PM
Your Name  

JP

Your Location  

UK

Years of Shorthand  

Long time

N.Era/Pit2K/Tee/Grg/??  

New Era

Your Comments  

Thank you. I agree that a discussion of the rules might just be the thing. A copy is on the way to me already! I really do want to get to the point of comfort with Pitman. I began learning it when I was in my early teens and have never lost interest or affection. Your site has kept it in my mind recently.

(=This book will be \"un-put-downable\" as they say, to those of us interested in all the details. There is another very slim volume (99 pg) called \"Examination Notes in Pitman Shorthand\" by H WB Wilson (ISBN 0 273 40527 6) which goes through points of theory and outlines, in the same vein as the commentary, designed \"to assist the student in preparing for shorthand theory examinations or for the examinations for teaching qualifications\", although there is probably some overlap with Taylor\'s book. BP)

   


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